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2012.11.13 10:28

Constitutional Court decision: Conservatives and Labour differ in interpretation

Jorge Marcano | The Lithuania Tribune2012.11.13 10:28

The battle over the Constitutional Court’s real meaning and interpretation continued today as both the outgoing prime minister and the Labour Party’s leader attempted to swing public opinion their way by deliberately selecting which part of the ruling to highlight and which parts to ignore.

The battle over the Constitutional Court’s real meaning and interpretation continued today as both the outgoing prime minister and the Labour Party’s leader attempted to swing public opinion their way by deliberately selecting which part of the ruling to highlight and which parts to ignore.

Outgoing Prime Minister Kubilius hopes that the court’s ruling would be implemented soon, “the constitutional court always makes right decisions, they need to be carried out in action. I believe that the Seimas will vote in support of the conclusions of the Constitutional Court, even if the conclusions refer to some parties represented in the Seimas. My proposal to our political group will be to vote in accord in support to the actions specified in the Constitutional Court’s conclusions,” Kubilius said to the media.

In the meantime, Labour Party’s leader, Viktor Uspaskich hailed as a victory the ruling made by the Constitutional Court. In his words, the court’s decision vindicated his party from fraud charges. Speaking to journalists today after President Grybauskaite’s transparency remarks, Uspaskich stated that “the Labour Party is now somewhat acquitted. The fuelling is done by some members who are subject to judicial proceedings. So far I know from the proceedings that none of the suspects who have been referred to by the Constitutional Court have been summoned. It is rather odd – an investigation has been started, the guilty people have been announced publicly and they aren’t even invited to interrogations?”, the labour party’s leader declared about the controversial bookkeeping case.

Mr. Uspaskich did not elaborate and provided a response to the president’s opinion about his party or her repeated criticism of what his party would represent for the upcoming coalition, “I don’t know, ask her. You see, we have statements, and once they’re over and there are decisions, we’ll see what can be done. I don’t want to comment or anything. (I just want) one decision or another, I am happy with any. But there should be one by now, a country cannot be drowned into nobody knows where like this. Nobody makes any explanations. I am happy with any decision,” Vitkor Uspaskich expressed.

The Labour Party continues to hold talks about a future coalition government with the Social Democrats and the Order and Justice party. Altogether, they have between 77 and 78 mandates in the country’s 141-seat parliament.


Lithuania Tribune