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2012.11.05 20:05

Social Democrats, Labour Party and the Order and Justice Party win Lithuania’s second round voting

Jorge Marcano | The Lithuania Tribune2012.11.05 20:05

With 75% of the votes counted, the Social Democrats, the Labour Party and the right-wing, Order and Justice Party have triumphed on the run-off vote on Lithuania’s parliamentary elections.

According to official data, the Social Democrats have obtained 38 seats, the Labour Party garnered 29 seats whilst Order and Justice secured around 11 seats. If the figures are confirmed, the three parties would be in a position to form a three-party coalition with a 78 seats majority out of 141 seats available in the Seimas.

The outgoing Kubilius administration and his allies obtained 34 seats.

Speaking a few minutes ago to media, Algirdas Butkevicius, the Social Democratic leader said that “if we have some 79 seats, that might be enough”, expressing that there will not be a need to call a fourth partner in the next coalition to rule Lithuania for the next 4 years.

Although Mr. Butkevicius does not entirely rule out the possibility of a fourth partner in a future coalition, “the last time we met after the first round, we clearly said that we are open and some other party might join our trio. I believe we might also talk about other parties joining after the second round. I cannot answer today. Of course, I believe the Way of Courage party is a no, and we are ready to talk to other parties” said Butkevicius.

In further development, the Social Democratic leader that Andrius Palionis, an independent candidate and son of the late Social Democratic MP, Juozas Palionis, would join the Social Democratic political group in parliament. Once again, Butkevicius refused to speculate on who will be the next country’s prime minister as this is a presidential prerogative.

He also discounted talking about specific people or parties for future ministries, “we have agreed that every ministry will be run by a person who is competent, capable of understanding what problems they have to solve and what they have to do,” concluded Butkevicius.