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2013.11.25 14:26

Who benefits from fighting with the Poles over national minorities?

DELFI.lt2013.11.25 14:26

Currently, the Seimas has two law projects registered that determine the rights, freedoms, and responsibilities of the national minorities that reside in Lithuania, writes www.delfi.lt with reference to the news agency ELTA.

 Currently, the Seimas has two law projects registered that determine the rights, freedoms, and responsibilities of the national minorities that reside in Lithuania, writes www.delfi.lt with reference to the news agency ELTA.

There is also one more project in the government. However, no one is satisfied.

The daily newspaper Lietuvos žinios wrote that after failing to receive the promised National Minorities Law from the government, the Lithuanian Poles’ Electoral Action (LLRA) had decided to return the previous version of the law to the Seimas.

Conservatives who don’t seem to spare any criticism for the “archival” law had put together their own version of the law. Last week, conservative MP Valentinas Stundys and a few other members of the Homeland Union-Lithuanian Christian Democrats faction presented their own version of the Law on National Minorities.

In the meantime, the Law on National Minorities created by the working group which was initiated by LLRA delegate the Vice Minister of Culture Edvardas Trusevicius is still having a hard time getting to the Seimas. Although the words are already on paper, they satisfy neither the politicians nor the members of national minorities.

Former National Communities Council coordinator Imantas Melianas is skeptical about both law projects registered by factions within the Seimas.

“It’s a parody, a farce, because this ‘protocol of good intentions’ cannot be considered a law,” said I. Melinas about the LLRA’s proposals.

In his opinion, the LLRA’s main interest is to maintain the conflict that surrounds national minorities because it allows for the mobilisation of their electorate. If the issues concerning national minorities are resolved their influence will decline.

According to I. Melianas, the Law on National Minorities was unexpectedly brought up by Seimas opposition Homeland Union members for the sake of “political competition”.

“It’s a pity that this task isn’t taken seriously because national security and foreign affairs are very much related to nationality politics.”